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So, I'm a musician as you all know http://jaromeubanks.com/ check it out holla! Over the past few weeks I have been thinking of getting into coaching because I feel like singing is a lot more complex then it needs to be and I could definitely simplify a lot of it. I was not a natural singer and it took me a while to figure things out. so, if someone is having problems chances are I have had that same problem and have techniques to fix it. However, I wouldn't want teaching to get in the way of my career as a musician.  I could see myself teaching to pay the bills and slowly stop writing songs and performing at venues. I want to be known as a singer first and a teacher second not the other way around. Is this a legit fear?
Your fears are not totally unfounded.

Time that could be spent writing songs will be spent teaching. But that is supposing that you would use a majority of your time to write songs. I don't think it has to be either / or.

There is the danger of burning out on musical stuff. Such as dealing with singers all day and now you just want a break from songs, altogether. That won't necessarily happen but it could.

But it can regardless of what you do. I am not a vocal coach and I do not make money from music. I am operations manager for a contractor in a specialized area of electrical work. And I live quite a distance from where my office is. So, most of my singing is in the left hand lane, 80 mph, on cruise control. Even if I wanted to teach voice, my time for such is very limited. In addition, I am old, another mark against me.

To make matters worse, I think singing should be simpler and easier, like you were mentioning. So, I would be fighting (figuratively) with students who want to compare me to other teachers or disregard what I say or even refute it. I am not saying I would not take your money. Just trying to hold down the frustration level. But hey, you want to pay me some money to tell me what you think? Fine, I can do that without a doctorate in psychology.

Anyway, I think you should try both. Why? Because my foretelling and your misgivings may turn out to not happen at all. Or all of them will happen. But functionally, you are going to gravitate to what makes you the most money for the time spent.

I love to sing. I want to write more originals and release them. Like Courtney Love said, a song may sell for a dollar but if you are collecting the dollar then selling only 20,000 units is fine for you and is not fine for a major label that needs artists to sell platinum (1,000,000 units sold US.) I have everything at home to be a one man band. Bass, a few guitars from electric to acoustic to classical. Keyboards. Electronic dum rack. Interface, 3 mics (2 LDC, 1 dynamic). Fender 85 combo amp, holmes 8 watt practice amp suitable for recording, pro rack mount digital processor modeler (Roand GS-6), Reaper DAW. But those things do not make me money yet, for the time spent.

My day job as operations manager pays me very well. It is 55 miles from the door of my house to the door of my office. Because of my salary, I have kept the roof over our head paying off a tax loan (the recession was very hard on me), food on the table, paying insurance on my house and our two cars. And my car is new. I bought a 2016 Corolla LE in May of last year.

I have a company toll tag in my car. When my tires wear out, they let me buy new ones on the company card. I put gas in my tank on that card. If I want to change my oil at work (we keep supplies to do oil changes on our fleet of service trucks,) I can buy the oil (synthetic) and filters on the company card. As it is, my car payments include regular maintenance at the dealership so I get it done there. (shout out to the great people and service at Toyota of Dallas.)

Six years ago, the outside air conditioning unit on my house bit the dust. In August. My company paid for a new one. I have dual participation in a retirement investment fund, first time ever in my life and I need it because retirement age is only 17 years away for me (born in 1964, I have to work until I am 70.) Only thing we don't have is health insurance or dental. But even for that, I can put it on the company card and get an amount deducted from check.

Put that all together and I could not make that on the road playing in bars, no matter how romantic that is. In fact, I would say that total salary and benefits would equal that of some electrical engineers, though I did not finish my engineering degree (University of Texas at Arlington starting in 1982.) But Texas recognizes state licensed master electricians such as myself as electrical designers from the sheer weight of experience in the field. I won't bore you with details on that but they don't just give those out.

So, 5 days a week, I get up at 4 am so that I can get out of the house no later than 5 am and get to the office and shop no later than 6 am. First crew shows up at 6:30 am to give job information from the day before and to work info for the day at hand. This happens for all of our installation crews and our tech services guy. I compile that and give to one of my bosses who is one of the two owners of the company. And he does payroll and invoicing. On average, I don't get away from the office earlier than 4 pm. Thanks to traffic in the Dallas and Collin county areas, It can take 1.5 to 2 hours to get home. All the way, answering phone calls (bluetooth in my car is synch'd with my work cellphone) and having spout from memory, sections of the National Electric Code book (2014, and by September, the new 2017 edition, changes published every 3 years) calculating amp loads for projects and remember job details while doing that very same 80 mph and dealing with traffic, etc.

So, the biggest chunk of my day is doing what makes me the most money. And that is what will happen for you. It is a natural thing. You will gravitate toward what makes money. Mike Rowe said it best. It is okay to have passions for things. But for making money and supporting yourself, you need to go toward what is opportunistic. So, you may find yourself teaching more than writing. And that is okay. That does not make you less of a writer.
(04-29-2017, 01:04 PM)ronws Wrote: [ -> ]Your fears are not totally unfounded.

Time that could be spent writing songs will be spent teaching. But that is supposing that you would use a majority of your time to write songs. I don't think it has to be either / or.

There is the danger of burning out on musical stuff. Such as dealing with singers all day and now you just want a break from songs, altogether. That won't necessarily happen but it could.

But it can regardless of what you do. I am not a vocal coach and I do not make money from music. I am operations manager for a contractor in a specialized area of electrical work. And I live quite a distance from where my office is. So, most of my singing is in the left hand lane, 80 mph, on cruise control. Even if I wanted to teach voice, my time for such is very limited. In addition, I am old, another mark against me.

To make matters worse, I think singing should be simpler and easier, like you were mentioning. So, I would be fighting (figuratively) with students who want to compare me to other teachers or disregard what I say or even refute it. I am not saying I would not take your money. Just trying to hold down the frustration level. But hey, you want to pay me some money to tell me what you think? Fine, I can do that without a doctorate in psychology.

Anyway, I think you should try both. Why? Because my foretelling and your misgivings may turn out to not happen at all. Or all of them will happen. But functionally, you are going to gravitate to what makes you the most money for the time spent.

I love to sing. I want to write more originals and release them. Like Courtney Love said, a song may sell for a dollar but if you are collecting the dollar then selling only 20,000 units is fine for you and is not fine for a major label that needs artists to sell platinum (1,000,000 units sold US.) I have everything at home to be a one man band. Bass, a few guitars from electric to acoustic to classical. Keyboards. Electronic dum rack. Interface, 3 mics (2 LDC, 1 dynamic). Fender 85 combo amp, holmes 8 watt practice amp suitable for recording, pro rack mount digital processor modeler (Roand GS-6), Reaper DAW. But those things do not make me money yet, for the time spent.

My day job as operations manager pays me very well. It is 55 miles from the door of my house to the door of my office. Because of my salary, I have kept the roof over our head paying off a tax loan (the recession was very hard on me), food on the table, paying insurance on my house and our two cars. And my car is new. I bought a 2016 Corolla LE in May of last year.

I have a company toll tag in my car. When my tires wear out, they let me buy new ones on the company card. I put gas in my tank on that card. If I want to change my oil at work (we keep supplies to do oil changes on our fleet of service trucks,) I can buy the oil (synthetic) and filters on the company card. As it is, my car payments include regular maintenance at the dealership so I get it done there. (shout out to the great people and service at Toyota of Dallas.)

Six years ago, the outside air conditioning unit on my house bit the dust. In August. My company paid for a new one. I have dual participation in a retirement investment fund, first time ever in my life and I need it because retirement age is only 17 years away for me (born in 1964, I have to work until I am 70.) Only thing we don't have is health insurance or dental. But even for that, I can put it on the company card and get an amount deducted from check.

Put that all together and I could not make that on the road playing in bars, no matter how romantic that is. In fact, I would say that total salary and benefits would equal that of some electrical engineers, though I did not finish my engineering degree (University of Texas at Arlington starting in 1982.) But Texas recognizes state licensed master electricians such as myself as electrical designers from the sheer weight of experience in the field. I won't bore you with details on that but they don't just give those out.

So, 5 days a week, I get up at 4 am so that I can get out of the house no later than 5 am and get to the office and shop no later than 6 am. First crew shows up at 6:30 am to give job information from the day before and to work info for the day at hand. This happens for all of our installation crews and our tech services guy. I compile that and give to one of my bosses who is one of the two owners of the company. And he does payroll and invoicing. On average, I don't get away from the office earlier than 4 pm. Thanks to traffic in the Dallas and Collin county areas, It can take 1.5 to 2 hours to get home. All the way, answering phone calls (bluetooth in my car is synch'd with my work cellphone) and having spout from memory, sections of the National Electric Code book (2014, and by September, the new 2017 edition, changes published every 3 years) calculating amp loads for projects and remember job details while doing that very same 80 mph and dealing with traffic, etc.

So, the biggest chunk of my day is doing what makes me the most money. And that is what will happen for you. It is a natural thing. You will gravitate toward what makes money. Mike Rowe said it best. It is okay to have passions for things. But for making money and supporting yourself, you need to go toward what is opportunistic. So, you may find yourself teaching more than writing. And that is okay. That does not make you less of a writer.
Thanks, Yea I am a fan of Mike Rowe and think he has very interesting ideas. I kinda think though if being a musician isn't my main focus it won't happen. but I do think i could make good money rather quickly being a teacher.
It was often said that to truly succeed at something, you must value it above all else. That a successful musician had to go after it without any "back-up" plan. And there a bunch of broke musicians living in trailers and relatives' spare rooms who believed that with all their hearts. The ones that succeeded always had something else they could do and also more than one avenue into making money in music. George Lynch was teaching guitar and putting out home study kits and kept doing it during his time with Dokken and Lynch Mob. And still does it. Others managed to learn early on to retain copyright because being a songwriter is a steady paycheck to that of a recording or performing artist.

Others got actual real jobs and started other businesses. Bruce Dickinson is a licensed commercial airline pilot and these days, he is part owner and pilot for an avaiation company and airline based in Cardiff, Wales.

Bobby Blotzer, the drummer from Ratt, has a carpet cleaning business. Vanilla Ice remodels houses. Rikki Rocket from Poison has a company that builds drum kits. Eddie Van Halen holds patents on the Frankenstein re-issue and a few more signature guitars and the 5150 amp series.

Sammy Hagar owns restaurants. Developed and owned Cabo Wabo Tequila then sold that to his competition. Now, he has branched into making rum.

Geoffrey Tate has a winery and label. His wine is named Insania. Maynard Keenan owns a winery in Arizona, that he literally built from scratch on his own property.

Corey Taylor and Henry Rollins are accomplished authors, actors.

M Shadows got with a game designer and developed an app-based video game that includes Avenged Sevenfold music in it.

Point being that all these guys had other interests and "back-up plans." Musical fame and fortune rise and fall.

And there are other ways to get your music out to the people, it just may change from the older formats and methods. Courtney Love pointed that as an independent through an online distributor, you may only be selling a song for a dollar. But with you keeping a functional 95 oercent, you make more money at 10,000 units sold than you would with an effective 3 percent on a major label deal.

Also, you can still write music, even while you are teaching. It is called time management. You don't write a hit song because you hammered through 10 hours of frustration. You write a hit song in 5 minutes because you needed one and thought it would be nice to have a piece of cherry pie. The trick to writing songs while being busy with other things is to have a note pad or ipad handy and a portable digital recorder to hum bits of melody or chord ideas.
You should ask Daniel Formica. He's a great singer and teacher who is constantly gigging and performing.
Yes, but when you think of Daniel Formica you think of him as a voice coach. Sure, he is a good singer but you're not going on spotify to add his songs to a playlist. Also, when he performs it's mostly covers very little original stuff if any.
Jarom raises a good point. Daniel is a working singer who also teaches. I am sure that he writes songs, too. But I have not heard them and I have not seen albums of his advertised. Which is not a detriment or insult to him. He is doing what makes him happy. I think the main question raised here is time management. How does one teach and write music? In that case, it could be similar to how Daniel manages time. So, yeah, he is not teaching while performing a gig. But he is teaching at other times. The biggest logistical concern for vocal coaches is lessons with people, in person. That requires some time of travel and a block of time, at least an hour, to have the lesson. Within that lesson will be some technical exercises, review of progress since the last time, ideas to work on for the next time. Unless you are just giving stand alone lessons, pay as you go.
Name one teacher known for their original music more than their teaching

Pro tip:  you probably can't

Name one teacher known for their original music more than their teaching

Pro tip:  you probably can't
Yea, thats my fear.... I feel like i could make great money with my simple approach but my heart is set on performing
(05-09-2017, 02:16 AM)JaromEubanks Wrote: [ -> ]Yea, thats my fear.... I feel like i could make great money with my simple approach  but my heart is set on performing

Have you ever performed at an open mic event?  I have, it's an exciting, nervewracking and fun experience!  I look forward to doing more with my guitarist friend.  It's awesome that I can sing in front of people and feel like I'm singing by myself at home in my room.  I sing to my friends and people passing by at work all the time, on stage is a little bit different though.  You want to give a good performance and to do that you need to feel comfortable.  I'm looking forward to performing more and gaining more confidence as well as getting feedback from an audience on some original music I'm working on.  Suffice to say I understand why your heart is set on performing.
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